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Tag Archives: cellphone

High Amount of Summons Issued in 2017

Amazingly, over the first four months of 2017, New York State Troopers issued 14,452 Traffic Summons! This means that everyone must drive carefully, as the state is cracking down on any offenses.

If you receive a summons for an improper turn, or an illegal U-turn, or any other moving violation, an experienced traffic ticket attorney can help you. Call us at 212-227-9008 or email us at michaelblock.law@gmail.com.

 

Photo via VisualHunt.com

Southern State Safety Check

Two key players in Nassau County have called upon the state to improve the Southern State Parkway due to safety concerns. Over a 5-year period, there has been over 10,000 traffic accidents on the Southern State Parkway. This number is way too high! What do you think?

If you receive a summons for a speeding violation, cellphone, or any other moving violation in NY State, an experienced traffic ticket attorney can help. Call us at 212-227-9008 or email us at michaelblock.law@gmail.com.
Photo via Visual Hunt

Texting while biking in NYC, still legal?

It is still legal to use your cellphone while you are operating your bicycle on the streets of this great city. The NYC.gov provides all of the bike laws for a bicycle operator. There is no law, however, against operating a cellphone while riding a bicycle. There is merely a safety tip suggesting you don’t use your phone while biking.

A bill was introduced into city hall back in 2014, by councilman Mark Trayger, but no action had been taken. The law would have protected the lives of bikers, drivers, and pedestrians alike. The bill stated a $50 fine for the first offense, and a $200 fine for repeat violations.

We believe texting and riding a bicylce should be illegal! Have a cellphone ticket? Caught operating a portable electronic device? We can help. Call us at 212-227-9008 or shoot us an email at michaelblock.law@gmail.com

Uber Expands to College Towns in Upstate New York to Curb Drunk Driving

Uber Moves to College Towns in Upstate New York to Curb Drunk Driving

As part of the ride-hailing service Uber’s push to expand to upstate New York, it has a specific message for college students: We want to help you get home safely after a night of drinking.

The company’s app is popular among millennials, but it is not available in upstate college towns. Uber officials hope the State Legislature will pass new rules allowing the service to move beyond New York City next year.

Despite its many fans, Uber has faced legal problems in the United States and abroad, and criticism over its aggressive tactics. As part of the company’s efforts to adopt a softer tone, officials have said the service can help reduce drunken driving.

Josh Mohrer, the general manager of Uber NY, spoke at the state Capitol on Tuesday in favor of expanding the ride-sharing service into the Albany area. A Push to Use Ride Sharing to Drive Economic Growth in Upstate New York.

Travis Kalanick, chief of Uber, last month in Munich. He spoke about compromising with regulators he once sparred with.   Some students are eagerly awaiting the arrival of Uber and other ride-hailing apps like Lyft. At Syracuse University, Aysha Seedat, the student association president, has recently called attention to the need for the apps in the city. When students leave bars late at night, she said, many are

Friends toast at P.J. Wheelman’s after using the program in Evesham, where local officials said drunken driving had increased.

Over the summer while she was home in northern New Jersey, where Uber operates, Ms. Seedat and her friends used the app instead of trying to figure out who would drive home.

“We’re going to take an Uber, and we’re not going to take any chances,” Ms. Seedat, a 21-year-old senior who is studying public policy, said.

In the next few weeks, the university’s student assembly plans to vote on a resolution to support new ride-hailing legislation. Ms. Seedat has talked to students at other universities, including Rochester Institute of Technology and the State University of New York at Buffalo, about sending a joint letter to state legislators arguing that the services would improve safety.

This month, Uber began offering free rides home from bars in Evesham Township in southern New Jersey, a community where local officials said drunken driving had increased. From 9 p.m. to 2 a.m., residents can request a ride from Uber or another ride service, and the township will pay for them through Jan. 2.

“If you feel that you’re not capable of driving home, we’re going to make it really, really simple for you,” the township’s mayor, Randy Brown, said at a news conference this month.

In New York, Long Island is known for having among the highest number of alcohol-related crashes in the state. A crash this summer in Suffolk County, in which a man was charged with driving while intoxicated after hitting and killing four young women riding in a limousine, brought renewed attention to the problem.

About four out of five alcohol-related crashes in the state happened outside New York City in 2013, despite the city’s huge share of the population, according to state data. The counties that include Buffalo and Rochester, where a number of colleges are, also have among the highest number of crashes.

Donald Hallowell, 46, an Uber driver participating in the Evesham program.

The state chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving plans to lobby for a ride-hailing bill during the next legislative session, which begins in January. Richard Mallow, the group’s state executive director, said the apps reach young people where they spend much of their time — on their smartphones.

Last week, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, signaled that he wanted to create a statewide licensing system for ride-hailing companies. As Mayor Bill de Blasio, a Democrat, quarreled with Uber this summer over his proposal to cap the number of for-hire vehicles in New York City, Mr. Cuomo praised the company for creating jobs.

But taxi groups and others have questioned whether the company creates good-paying jobs. Uber says its drivers are independent contractors, but several recent local rulings have said that they should be considered employees. Opponents have also argued that new state rules could remove current consumer and driver protections in the industry.

Not all students support the effort. Stony Brook University on Long Island already has plenty of safe travel options for students who are drinking, including a reliable local taxi service called Lindy’s, said Cole Lee, the president of the university’s undergraduate student government. Mr. Lee, 20, who lives on campus and owns a car, has never used Uber.

“Although it sounds nice, I can’t say that I could see it being extremely successful here,” he said.

In Buffalo, a blog and apparel company called Rise Collaborative recently started an online petition calling for ride-hailing apps in upstate New York, and many college students have signed on. The founders of the blog and Ms. Seedat said they were not prompted by Uber officials to take up the cause — they simply see a need for it.

The mayor of Syracuse, Stephanie A. Miner, a Democrat, said she wanted Uber in her city and believed the competition could prompt local car services to improve.

“There is a big need for it here,” she said, “and I think you’re seeing particularly among young people an expectation to have Uber.”

Article Originally Featured on The New York Times

*Photo Credit: “51920006” By: Samantha Cohen/Source: Flickr

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Middle Aged Drivers Talk and Text on Cellphones while Driving Too

Middle-Aged drivers are texting and using cellphones while driving.
Maybe it’s time to take away our allowance? It turns out that teenagers aren’t the only ones who text and drive. Middle-aged drivers do it too and are at a higher risk of causing a car crash because of it, according to a study by the University of California, San Diego.  The research found that most middle-aged drivers admit to using their cell phones regularly while driving, even with children in the car; drivers also feel pressured to answer work calls while driving.
More than one in four car accidents are caused by cell phone use, says the National Safety Council (NSC). A driver’s crash risk increases eight-fold if they are texting; even talking hands-free makes drivers four times more likely to be involved in a crash.

The authors of the study hope companies will talk to employees about the risks associated with distracted driving, and institute policies that will discourage them from using their cell phones while in the car.

The study found that 75 percent of the participants talk on cell phones hands-free, and almost 90 percent of them consider themselves capable or very capable drivers while doing so. Less than 30 percent of participants knew that talking on a hands-free phone increases the risk of crashing to the same degree as driving at the legal alcohol limit, according to the study which was published in the Journal of Transport and Health.

“We weren’t surprised to see that relatively few people understand the risks of distracted driving,” said Jessa Engelberg, lead author of the study, in a press release. “What we were really interested in was whether factors like children and work obligations had an effect on people’s behavior.”

Apparently they do not. Middle-aged drivers continued to use their mobile phones with kids in the car and more than one-third of the participants said they felt pressure to answer a call from the office.

Maybe what we need is an app that automatically turns off our phones when we start up the ignition?

*Photo Credit: “texting and driving” By: frankieleon/Source: Flickr

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