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Tag Archives: traffic stop

NY Traffic Ticket Lawyer: Crackdown on Drunk Driving Starts Today

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — State troopers and law enforcement across the state will be taking part in this year’s national “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign, which begins Friday and runs through New Year’s Day.

Motorists will notice more patrols along highways and sobriety checkpoints during the campaign, state police said. Those are paid for by the Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee.

Troopers will be using marked and unmarked vehicles to curb distracted driving, seat belt violations and people violating the Move Over Law.

“Traffic safety will be a top priority this holiday season,” New York State Police Superintendent Joseph A. D’Amico said. “If you’re celebrating, please do so responsibly. Don’t drink and drive, and if you are drinking, designate a sober driver or plan ahead for a ride home.”

Last year troopers issued more than 49,000 tickets during the crackdown. That included 17,000 tickets for speeding, 1,700 for distracted driving and about 700 for Move Over Law violations.

State police said more than 700 people were arrested for DWI and 13 people were killed in car accidents.

The state police offered the following advice to motorists during the holidays:

–Plan a safe way home before the celebrating begins
–Before drinking, designate a sober driver
–If you’re impaired, use a taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation
–Use your community’s sober ride program
–If you happen to see a drunk driver on the road, don’t hesitate to contact police
–If you know someone who is about to drive or ride while impaired, take their keys and help them make other arrangements

Article Originally Featured on Syracuse.com

Photo Credit: “Breath Test” by Oregon Department of Transportation/Source: Flickr

Client Success Story: 2 Point Disobey Traffic Device in Nassau County Reduced to 0 Points

Another happy client received no points for a 2 point Disobey Device Ticket in Nassau County Traffic Violations Agency.

Disobeying Traffic Device in Long Island, New York is a common catchall violation that applies to disobeying any marking on the road or traffic sign such as a STOP or YIELD.

The law defines disobeying a traffic control device as violating any sign, marking, or device (placed by authority) that regulates, warns and guides traffic.  This means that disobeying any marking on the pavement and any traffic signs (such as a STOP or YIELD) are considered a “traffic device” offense.  The fine for disobeying a traffic control device starts at $138 in New York City.

A disobey device lawyer is waiting to help you. New York Traffic Ticket Law can be very damaging to your driving record. My advice is: don’t pay that traffic ticket. Take a moment now to share a few details about your ticket here.

We always fight for the most favorable outcome and are always glad to have great results for our clients. If you’ve received a disobeying traffic device ticket or any other type of moving violation, let us help you! Email us at michaelblock.law@gmail.com or call (212) 227-9008 to learn how we can defend you.

We fight tickets all over New York, including: Queens, Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, and Long Island.

Vision Zero Vigil Takes Over Union Square

A group of 1,000 people, all of whom were affected in one way or another by serious traffic accidents in New York City, gathered in Union Square on Wednesday night. They had a very clear message – traffic accidents are avoidable and preventable. That is the driving force behind Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero policy, which seeks to end all pedestrian traffic deaths in New York City. So far in 2015, there have been 123 traffic related deaths and over 23,000 serious injuries.

The strategy to end pedestrian traffic deaths comes consists of increased enforcement of speeding, failure to yield, and distracted driving offenses, as well as ambitious plans to redesign some of the more dangerous city streets. Speed cameras have been set up in certain areas of NYC and statistics show that speeding violations caught by those cameras have actually decreased; this means drivers are becoming more aware of their surroundings and the regular enforcement of these violations.

While progress has been made, events like the Vision Zero Vigil highlight the fact that there is still much work to be done in order to bring the number of pedestrian deaths down to zero in New York City. What are your thoughts on Vision Zero? Could the Mayor be doing more? Or is he on the right path?

Queens Man had License Suspended 32 Times

During a traffic stop this past weekend, a driver from Queens was arrested for a traffic violation and upon investigation, the arresting officer discovered the man’s license had been suspended thirty-two times before. The driver faces multiple charges including three counts of aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. In addition, the police officer reported that the man failed to comply with the orders of the police officer when he refused to produce his proper license and registration at the time of the stop and was subsequently charged with second-degree obstructing governmental administration. Both charges are misdemeanors, though depending on the circumstances, aggravated unlicensed operation can also be a felony crime.

If you are facing license suspension, or if your license has already been suspended, make sure to call us immediately at 212-227-9008 or email us at michaelblock.law@gmail.com so we can begin working on your case.

Long Island Traffic Lawyer - Distracted Driving can be Just as Dangerous as Drunk Driving

Everyone knows that driving while intoxicated is one of the most dangerous things a person could do, but what about driving while you have to go to the bathroom? Or driving while daydreaming? Numerous studies have been conducted that show how some of these other activities can be just as dangerous as drunk driving:

Drowsiness and Congestion

Sleeping while drowsy can be brought on by either not having enough sleep or taking medication such as sleeping pills or muscle relaxers before you drive. The TV show Mythbusters conducted a test that showed driving after being awake for 30 hours to be 10 times as dangerous as driving after having 2 drinks. Studies have also shown that teenagers are less likely to pull over and take a nap if they are feeling tired than adults. As far as medication is concerned, many drivers don’t realize that driving after taking a sleeping pill or other medication that causes drowsiness could lead to them being arrested for DUI – Driving Under the Influence. The FDA mandates that warnings be put on all bottles that contain sleeping pills to let drivers know the danger they face if they get in the car after taking the pills. Many times, drivers will take non-drowsy cough or cold medicine to get through the day – but a recent study found that motorists who drive with the flu or a bad head cold have their reaction time cut in half, which is about the same as those who drank 4 shots of double whiskey. Even more disturbing though is that almost half of all drivers have driven while sick.

Cell Phones

Research has shown that texting while driving can be twice as dangerous as drunk driving. Other studies report that texting while driving can be four to six times as distracting as drunk driving. A texting ticket in New York carries 5 points, which is one of the highest point tickets you can receive in New York. However, it does not carry a criminal charge like DWI or DUI. And while it is still legal to speak on a hands-free phone while driving, studies tend to agree that talking on the phone, whether hands-free or not, is still an extremely dangerous practice. A University of Utah study found that drivers with a .08 BAL actually drove better than those who were on a phone. In fact, during the course of the study, three drivers who were using hands-free phones actually crashed into their pace cars. The issue may not be so much about what is in your hands, but rather what is on your mind.

Road Rage and Arguments

Driving while angry increases the chances of speeding, weaving and out of lanes, tailgating, and engaging in other aggressive driving behaviors. All of these things combined have killed anywhere from two to four times as many people as drunk driving. Road rage can cause drivers to act in ways they normally wouldn’t and can cause many problems on the road. While road rage is directed at drivers in other cars, arguments with people inside your car can be just as dangerous. Whether it’s on the phone or with your spouse sitting next to you, these arguments can lead to unsafe speeds and delayed reactions. A study in England found that drivers arguing with their spouse over the phone fared slightly better than those who were arguing in person, with the thought being that it is easier to ignore your spouse over the phone. Nonetheless, just like road rage, arguing with a spouse leads to distracted driving, which in turn can lead to auto fatalities.

Other Distractions

The next time you are on a long road trip, you may want to take advantage of rest areas to relieve yourself. A recent study had volunteers drink many glasses of water and then take basic cognitive tests – without being allowed to use the restroom. The results showed that people who have to use the bathroom performed just as poorly as those with a .05 Blood Alcohol Level, or 2 ½ drinks. Researchers determined that this was a form of distracted driving, since your mind can only concentrate on one thing at a time. Another thing common to long road trips – or even heavy traffic on your commute – is daydreaming. An analysis of distracted driving fatalities that occurred over a 2-year period – roughly 6,500 – showed that 62% involved daydreaming. This percentage is even higher than texting or talking on a cell phone.

On a side note

This may seem like common sense, but you probably should not drive if you have been smoking marijuana. Legal marijuana use is growing in the United States, whether it’s through state-legalization efforts or medical use and proponents say that driving under the influence of marijuana is relatively safe. This is because drivers who smoke marijuana tend to drive slower and pass field sobriety tests. However, the fact still remains that marijuana causes a delay in reaction time for drivers, which is extremely dangerous since drivers are required to make split-second decisions while on the road. The American Journal of Epidemiology found that marijuana use was present in 10% of all auto fatalities over the past decade. Police officers can charge drivers who are under the effects of marijuana with DUI, which is a criminal charge.

All of the actions listed above are forms of distracted driving – a practice so bad that there is a month (April) known as National Distracted Driving Awareness Month. Even so, all throughout the year police officers often engage in week or month-long crackdowns to combat distracted driving. Reaction times are cut, sometimes in half, which can lead to rear end accidents, running stop signs or stop lights, or driving at unsafe speeds.

If you receive a speeding ticket, cell phone ticket, or are arrested for DWI or DUI, please contact us immediately so we can begin working on your case and help you achieve the best outcome possible.

Supreme Court Rules that Police Officers Can’t Extend Traffic Stops

The Supreme Court ruled this week that officers who extend traffic stops in order to wait for drug sniffing dogs are in violation of the Fourth Amendment. The ruling stems from a case where an officer pulled over a motorist for driving erratically, questioned the driver and the passenger, and then issued a written warning. The police officer then had his drug sniffing dog search around the vehicle, at which point it found methamphetamine. Justice Ruth Bader-Ginsburg wrote in the majority that by conducting the search after the driver was issued the written warning, which was determined to be the conclusion of the routine traffic stop, the police officer violated the Fourth Amendment’s protection from unreasonable search and seizures.

This ruling may now have an effect on how police officers conduct traffic stops, such as when the stop is legally concluded. The amount of time needed to conduct a traffic stop may also become a concern.

What are your thoughts on this ruling? Is conducting a search after a traffic ticket or warning is issued truly a violation of the Fourth Amendment?

Nassau Town to Equip Police with Body Cameras

The Nassau County acting district attorney and the Freeport Police Department announced that all officers will soon be equipped with body cameras, while all marked cars and some unmarked cars will be equipped with dash mounted cameras. This means that nearly all traffic stops in Freeport will now be recorded. The announcement came just days before the shooting of an unarmed man in South Carolina which was captured on camera by a civilian. What do you think of this idea? Should all other Nassau and Suffolk towns follow suit? Or is there a reason police should not be recorded during traffic stops?